New Crisis Response Program in Raleigh: A Holistic Approach to Emergency Care

Continued Efforts in Raleigh to Implement Alternate Crisis Response Program for Mental Health Services

Efforts to create an Alternate Crisis Response Program in Raleigh are gaining momentum as the city moves forward with the initiative. Over the past few months, the city has been conducting listening and feedback sessions and extensive research to develop the program. The new team would include social workers, peer support specialists, and EMS personnel who would work collaboratively with police officers to respond to specific 911 calls. This group aims to provide de-escalation practices and immediate attention in emergency situations.

Dorine Martin, a mental health professional with twenty years of experience, is supporting this effort. She believes that increasing services, reducing the stigma around mental health care, and promoting overall community health are critical goals. Martin is excited about the team’s upcoming April update to the city council.

The integration of social workers, peer support specialists, and EMS personnel into emergency response teams represents a shift towards a more holistic approach to crisis intervention. By combining different expertise and perspectives, the program aims to address the root causes of emergencies and provide more effective and compassionate care to those in need.

For more information on the Alternate Crisis Response Program in Raleigh, you can click here for more details about this exciting initiative. The city’s commitment to creating a more comprehensive and supportive crisis response system is a positive step towards improving mental health care and emergency services for residents.

Raleigh officials have been working hard to develop an innovative crisis response program that focuses on providing immediate attention and de-escalation practices in emergency situations. The new team will include social workers, peer support specialists, EMS personnel, and police officers who will work together to address specific 911 calls.

Dorine Martin has been working with mental health patients for twenty years and supports this effort wholeheartedly. She believes that increasing services, reducing stigma around mental health care, and promoting overall community health are essential goals for any successful crisis response program.

The integration of social workers, peer support specialists, EMS personnel into emergency response teams represents a significant shift towards a holistic approach to crisis intervention. By combining different expertise and perspectives, this program aims to address the root causes of emergencies and provide more effective compassionate care for those in need.

For more information about this exciting initiative in Raleigh’s Alternate Crisis Response Program click here.

Raleigh officials have made significant progress in creating an alternate crisis response program that will focus on immediate attention de-escalation practices during emergency situations. The new team will consist of social workers

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